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E-News

Each month Dr. Paul Jehle publishes an e-newsletter that highlights an upcoming activity or product, or an historic event from our past that can serve as a lesson for current challenges we face as a nation and the responsibility we have as individuals. The most recent E-news is highlighted here, with back-issues of an historic nature available to peruse by title.

photo2 “Here I stand, may God help me, Amen” (April 2013)

It was four o’clock in the afternoon on the 17th of April, 1521 when Martin Luther arrived in Worms, Germany. He arrived confident that what he was promised – a fair trial and physical protection – would be honored. But alas, tyrannical governments are not usually honest, and this would be no exception. It was only due to Luther’s intense popularity that caused Charles V to call the entire German Parliament, called a Diet, together to “hear” him. Luther was shocked when his books were lined up in front of him.

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photo2 “Lessons from the Boston Massacre” (March 2013)

The year 1770 opened with tensions high between the citizens of Boston and the British soldiers stationed in the city and sleeping in tents on the Common.  The British soldiers were illegally stationed in the city during peacetime, a violation of the three English documents that made up its Constitution.  Forced quartering (housing and feeding) of soldiers coupled with several recorded abuses of those soldiers while in private homes only made matters worse.  After the “massacre” of March 5, 1770, Paul Revere painted a picture of what happened, and due to its depiction of a literal mass shooting by the British (ignoring the facts), caused the colonists to go to the brink of lawless rebellion.

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february The Right of Petition (February 2013)

On February 6, 1837 Congressman John Quincy Adams, former sixth President of the United States, and son of the 2nd President, made history.  Though for years petitions had been delivered to the House to abolish slavery, and many had been presented by John Quincy Adams himself, this one was unique.

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january “In the Name of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity (January 2013)

Ratification Day used to be celebrated in America.  Ratification Day, you might ask?  Yes, January 14, 1784 was the day the Treaty of Paris was ratified, ending our American War for Independence.  It was celebrated for bringing peace between England and America, but also because it was a bit of a miracle that it got confirmed. 

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december The Legacy of Christmas in America (December 2012)

Saint Francis of Assisi, on Christmas Eve in 1223, in order to turn the people’s attention away from materialism toward Christ, introduced for the first time the nativity scene.  Soon this image, coupled with a solemn church service, became traditions at Christmas.  Though these were all well established by the 17th century when the Pilgrims and Puritans arrived in New England, these believers were not interested in replicating the same traditions here in America, especially those that were Catholic. 

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november From Reformation Day to Election Day: a Legacy (November 2012)

When Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Wittenberg Church in Germany on October 31, 1517, no one knew the cataclysmic fruit that would grow from that tiny seed.  After all, they were 95 points he only wanted to discuss; inconsistencies he saw in the logic of the religious leaders of his day.  Most importantly, he saw inconsistencies with the Scriptures, especially in the matter of indulgences (buying forgiveness).

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The Capture of HMS Frolic (October 2012)

There are many lessons to be learned from historic events, even if they appear to be insignificant. This is true because all historic events involve people, and the lives of human beings contain within them the embedded lessons of their Creator. This is certainly true of Commodore Jacob Michael Jones. Jones was born near Smyrna in Kent County, Delaware in March of 1768.

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July news 1

The Siege of Fort Wayne (September 2012)

The dictionary defines a siege as “a military operation in which enemy forces surround a town or building, cutting off supplies, with the aim of compelling the surrender.” A military siege is common in wartime. If we think in spiritual terms, the parallels become obvious.

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Rock of Ages (August 2012)

When Augustus Toplady died on August 11, 1778, not many Americans took note for they were busy fighting for independence.  However, the nation that was being born would soon sing a song in harmony with the nation they were fighting fifty years later, composed by an American patriot.

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July news 1

A Declaration of Prayer (July 2012)

Americans are aware that the Declaration of Independence was officially signed by John Hancock on July 4, 1776.  They may not be aware that every line was debated, or that the Document’s “prayer clauses” were the culmination of proclamations for prayer that preceded it. 

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Lessons from Bunker Hill (June 2012)

June 17 is “Bunker Hill” Day in Massachusetts.  Recently, there has been a battle as to whether State workers get it off as a holiday, though it is not observed State-wide for anyone else.  The battle over State paid holidays is significant, but it distracts us from real lessons of patriotism, valor and Christian conviction. 

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may

Lessons from the Spirit of St. Louis (May 2012)

One pilot, one plane, one mission and one historic flight May 20-21, 1927 from New York to Paris made Charles Lindberg famous. However, he was the least likely candidate for such fame, and he didn’t like the attention. He flew not for fame or the for the prize money to be the first to cross the Atlantic. He flew to advance aviation as a service to mankind.

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enews

Lessons from the Titanic’s 100th Anniversary (April 2012)

On April 15, at approximately 2:40 AM, the Titanic slid beneath the cold, 31 degree ocean water 400 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.  The Titanic had been on her voyage to New York City for four days when it struck an iceberg on the night of the 14th.  The tragedy was that 61% of the passengers and 80% of the crew died.  The reason such a high percentage died was simple: the sin of pride.  Only 20% of the men, yet 74% of the women and 52% of the children survived.  The reason so many women and children survived was also simple: the principle of self-sacrifice.

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enews

Give me Liberty, or give me Death! (March 2012)

On March 23, 1775, Patrick Henry’s famous words were uttered at St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia.  Though most Americans remember the closing, they are not as familiar with the context of his speech and the ideas that gave it birth.

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enews The Publication of Pilgrim’s Progress – 1678 (February 2012)

Plymouth Rock Foundation’s E-News – February, 2012 by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director (www.plymrock.org) The Publication of Pilgrim’s Progress - 1678 “As I walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a den, and laid me down in that place to sleep; and as I slept, I dreamed a dream…” So begins ...

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enews The War of 1812 and the Battle of New Orleans (January 2012)

With an eye of fire and an emphatic blow upon the table, he cried: ‘by the Eternal, they shall not sleep on our soil!’  This famous declaration of General Andrew Jackson just before the Battle of New Orleans in January, 1815 virtually ended the War of 1812.  The Treaty of Ghent was ratified by the Senate of the United States a few weeks later.

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december enews

The Conversion of Adoniram Judson (December 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation’s E-News – December, 2011 by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director (www.plymrock.org) The Conversion of Adoniram Judson During the Christmas season we celebrate the incarnation of Christ. One way to remember the manger is to be reminded of the power of a soul being regenerated by the work of sovereign grace. If it weren’t for Christmas, ...

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nnovember

Mayflower Compact Day (November 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation’s E-News – November, 2011 by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director (www.plymrock.org) Mayflower Compact Day Mayflower Compact Day is hardly heard of these days. It used to be on the calendar a hundred and fifty years ago – at least in people’s minds. Now, it is not taught or remembered in most schools in America, where ...

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october

Reformation Day (October 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation’s E-News – October, 2011 by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director (www.plymrock.org) Reformation Day Reformation Day has been replaced in modern America by the “holiday” of Halloween. The word Halloween is simply a contraction of the two words “hallowed evening”, or the evening before All Saints Day (November 1st). Interestingly enough, All Saints Day (November 1st)

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July news 1

Constitution Day (September 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation’s E-News – September, 2011 by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director (www.plymrock.org) Constitution Day Constitution Day is all but unknown in America today. The actual document was initially signed by delegates sent from each State on September 17, 1787 after they had deliberated since May in Philadelphia. The day was unofficially observed by individual States and towns ...

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august

God, Gold and the Debt Ceiling (August 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News - August, 2011 God, Gold and the Debt Ceiling by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director All we have heard for weeks now are the predictions of the terrible consequences of default that will occur if Congress does not “get it together” and raise the debt ceiling by August 2nd. The Republicans as a whole (with a ...

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declaration

The Origion of the Declaration (July 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News - July, 2011 The Origin of the Declaration by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director This year Americans will celebrate the 235th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It is popular today to assert that the premises, or main ideas of the Declaration, especially those listed in the first two paragraphs, were derived from the Enlightenment, or ...

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teaparty

“Give-em Watts, boys!” - James Caldwell (June 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News - June, 2011 "Give-em Watts, boys!" - James Caldwell by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director In 1760 a young preacher, 26 years old, became pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Elizabethtown, New Jersey. In colonial America, most people knew their ancestry. James Caldwell was no different. His ancestors were Huguenots. The Huguenots were French believers during ...

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king james

The 400th Anniversary of the King James Bible (May 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News - May, 2011 The 400th Anniversary of the King James Bible by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director May 2nd, 2011 marks the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. We don’t celebrate the Bible much anymore. It used to be a book reverenced, respected and used as an authority on everything from ethics to literacy. ...

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april news

Lexington, Libya & Liberty (April 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News - April, 2011 Lexington, Libya & Liberty by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director April 19 should be forever marked in the American mind as the day a few Americans stood their ground, refusing to surrender their God-given rights in the face British tyranny. Yet, there is more to the story than re-telling the drama of ...

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march

Dorchester Heights & America (March 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News - March, 2011 Dorchester Heights & America by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director March 17 is well known to most Americans as St. Patrick’s Day. While this is an important day that commemorates some of the deepest Christian roots in our nation, another event took place on the same day in 1776 that helped set the stage ...

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february

Ronald Reagan & the Egyptian Crisis (February 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News – February, 2011 Ronald Reagan & the Egyptian Crisis by Dr. Paul Jehle, Executive Director On Sunday, February 6 of this year, Ronald Reagan would have turned 100. As we celebrate President’s Day, we should remember the significance of Reagan’s life by some of the words he uttered, and their application to current events such as ...

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forefathers

Peter Muhlenberg (January 2011)

Plymouth Rock Foundation E-News – January, 2011 Peter Muhlenberg On Sunday morning, January 21, 1776, in the village of Woodstock, Virginia, Pastor Muhlenberg carefully put on his Anglican pastoral robes as he did every Sunday. This time, however, there was an added expectation. War had come to the Colonies several months prior at Lexington and Concord in April, ...

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