The Pilgrim Church Service

The Pilgrim or Separatist church began in the home but focused on the exaltation and presence of Christ.  The revival of “hearth and home” in England was nurtured by families who had access to own the Geneva translation of the Bible in their own tongue.  Fathers would read from the Scriptures in the morning and…

The British Surrender at Yorktown

The British surrender at Yorktown on October 19, 1781 was a miracle of providential timing and intervention.  It involved at least four major ingredients that had to come together in the face of potential disaster.  The disasters included worthless paper money and the lack of an ability to support the troops.  In addition, troops outside…

The Grand Union Flag of 1776

On January 1, 1776, while the British laid siege to Boston, George Washington raised the Grand Union Flag on Prospect Hill near his headquarters in Cambridge. It was the first flag of the united colonies.  It was known as the Congress Colors, the First Navy Ensign and the Cambridge Flag and could be considered the…

First Prayer of the Continental Congress, 1774

In history we find some of the best writings to be apologetics or in defense of rights.  In 1774 the Continental Congress published its Declaration and Resolves stating in part: “…By the immutable laws of nature, the principles of the English constitution, and the several charters or compacts, have the following rights… life, liberty and…

The Story of Hawaii; our 50th State

It may come as a surprise to learn that it was a prayer meeting in 1806 and the work of missionaries in 1820 followed by a major revival that began the process of bringing the Hawaiian Islands into the United States.  In 1959 Congress gave its approval, in June 93% of the people of Hawaii…

American Hero Booker T. Washington

Booker Taliaferro Washington was born into slavery on April 5, 1856 in southwest Virginia.  Initially, like most slaves, he was known by his nickname “Booker” with no middle or surname.  But what began as a tragic result of the sin of slavery that stained the Declaration’s promise of God-given liberty for all was overcome by…

Ratification of the Articles of Confederation

On March 1, 1781, the first constitution of the United States, called the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, officially became the first American covenant of law.  Since the ratification required all 13 colonies to agree before it could be finalized, there were 39 months between the first colony, Virginia, who ratified in December of…

The Boston Tea Party

When people think of the historic Boston Tea Party that took place in 1773, they often have images of wild and lawless men destroying the personal property of others and throwing it into the sea in a riot, just so they don’t have to pay a very small tax.  About the only thing that is…

Gallaudet and the Bicentennial of Deaf Education

Thomas Gallaudet intended to be a preacher of the gospel from a young age, but  God intervened in a most unusual way.  In 1814, after graduating from Andover Theological Seminary, he resided in Hartford, Connecticut.  On May 25 of 1814 he observed nine year old Alice Cogswell watching other children play and not being included. …